Isolating the Subject is the Trick to Capturing Eye-Catching Photos

Did your well-composed photos earn the appreciation of fellow photographers? You might have experimented with Rule of Thirds, Centred Composition, Leading Lines, Fill the Frame, Pattern & Texture, Rule of Odds, Colour Theory, Frame within a Frame, Simplicity & Minimalism, Rule of Space & Left to Right Rule. Now, let’s understand Isolate the Subject Composition.

How to Use Isolate the Subject

First of all, when should you Isolate the Subject? Well, when you intend to focus all the attention of the viewer to your subject.

Check out the below picture of Hot Chocolate…tantalising, isn’t it?

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  • A wide Aperture of f4.5 was used to blur the background
  • Zoom lens of 34 mm was used
  • Both of the above isolated the subject (Hot Chocolate) which in turn help us to focus on the subject.

The below photograph was taken on a Diwali night!

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  • A wide Aperture of f5.6, Shutter Speed of 1/40 sec, ISO of 3200 were used
  • Zoom lens of 55 mm was used
  • The background is pitch-dark which instantly draws your eyes towards the earthen lamps

Take a look at the below photograph of a Grey Bush Chat in Binsar, Uttarakhand.

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Here’s a picture of a Coppersmith Barbet…

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And a snap of a Seashell taken at Ladghar Beach

isolate subject

  • In all of the above 3 pics, wide Aperture was used
  • The blurred background is less distracting
  • The above two resulted in Shallow Depth of Field which makes the subject stand out in the photograph

Protips:

  • Go for a plain & uncluttered background
  • If the background is cluttered or contains unimportant things, if possible, physically move things out of the shot.
  • Keep your subject in focus & blur the background by using wide aperture
  • Move closer to the subject or use a zoom lens

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Click on the below Image to see the Comic wherein the Camera explains Jo, the concept of Isolate the Subject with the help of practical examples.

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Rule of Space & Left to Right Rule: Photographic Composition Techniques

Want to create amazing photographs? Then, experiment with different composition guidelines which include Rule of Thirds, Centred Composition, Leading Lines, Fill the Frame, Pattern & Texture, Rule of Odds, Colour Theory, Frame within a Frame, Simplicity & Minimalism and many more.

How & Why to Use Rule of Space Composition

We all need our space, isn’t it? So do the subjects in our photographs!

Well, Rule of Space means when you’re photographing your subject, there should be more space in front of it than behind it.

For instance, if your subject is placed on the left side of the frame & is facing towards the right. Then, go for Rule of Space Composition – so that it gives you a feeling that your subject is facing into the frame & not out of it.

Another example is when you’re taking a picture of a moving object.

Take a look at the below photograph of the Camel Cart which was taken at the Rann of Kutch, Gujarat.

Rule of Space

And here’s a picture of a Boat in the Sea.

Left to Right

You’ll notice that in both the photographs, there is more space in the frame for the Camel Cart/ Boat to move into.

  • As a viewer, we tend to look forward to where our subject is heading. If the camel cart/boat was at the right hand side of the frame, it would lead us out of  the photograph.
  • We can mentally picture that the boat is moving into the space ahead as it sails along the sea.
  • It gives continuity in the picture.

What is Left to Right Rule & Why to Use it

They say that ‘We read an image from Left to Right’ & for this reason – any motion depicted in a picture should flow from left to right.

Left to Right 2

In the above still, you will see the people & the camel cart moving from the left to the right of the frame.

And check out the truck in the below pic which starts from the left side of the frame and heads towards the right side of the frame.

Left to Right

  • Both the snaps are easy on the eyes.
  • They are pleasant to look at, as we are used to read/look at an image from left to right rather than from right to left.

Well, above is only a guideline…if you’re of the opinion that Right to Left Rule appeals to you, then go ahead & experiment.

After all, Photography is an Art & ART HAS NO RULES.

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Click on the below Image to see the Comic wherein the Camera explains Jo, the concept of Rule of Space & Left to Right Rule with the help of practical examples.

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How to Use Simplicity & Minimalism to Create Great Photos

There is beauty in simplicity, don’t you agree? Then, why not use it in photography…

Simplicity & Minimalism, one of the composition technique, will empower you to bring out the beauty in the most ordinary scenes.

We have explained how to use Rule of Thirds, Centred Composition, Leading Lines, Fill the Frame, Pattern & Texture, Rule of Odds, Colour Theory, Frame within a Frame Composition in our earlier blogs, now let’s understand Simplicity & Minimalism!

What is Simplicity & Minimalism Composition

Heard of the phrase – ‘Less is More’? Well, it applies here! To use this composition, you’ll have to click a scene with an uncomplicated/clear background that blends in & doesn’t distract the viewer from the main subject.

How to Use Simplicity & Minimalism Composition

simplicity

In the above pic, the soothing water droplets hold your attention, isn’t it? Along with the natural surroundings: the green leaves, the rock, the stone, & the pebbles – the photo evokes a sense of simplicity and beauty.

Tip: Zoom in on part of your subject & focus on a particular detail.

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The above photo was taken at the Ovalekar Wadi Butterfly Garden. Look at the Striped Tiger Butterfly which was caught basking in the sun and relishing nectar. This composition enables you to capture the pure beauty of nature/life.

Tip: Use a good macro lens to capture every detail of the scene.

We bring you ‘Jo & His Camera’ Comic Strips wherein a Magical Camera gives DSLR photography tutorials to Jo.

Click on the below Image to see the Comic wherein the Camera explains Jo, the concept of Simplicity & Minimalism with the help of practical examples.

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How to Use Frame within a Frame Composition to Transform an Ordinary Scene into an Interesting Photo

Composition in photography empowers you to express your creativity and tell a story through your picture.

We have explained how to use Rule of Thirds, Centred Composition, Leading Lines, Fill the Frame, Pattern and Texture, Rule of Odds, Colour Theory in our earlier blogs, now let’s proceed to Frame within a Frame Composition!

What is Frame within a Frame Composition? How to Use it?

When you frame a scene using natural surroundings or man-made objects, it’s called Frame within a Frame Composition. You can use a window, a mirror, a bridge, an archway/doorway, a cave or overhanging branches to frame your scene. Even, if the scene is partially framed, it works well.

Mirror

Why to Use Frame within a Frame Composition

isolate it from any distraction and clutter

In the above pic taken at the Kala Ghoda Festival, the smartphone serves as a frame which draws your attention to the beautiful lanterns. It takes your eyes away from the surrounding clutter & distraction and lets you focus on the lanterns.

portraying depth

The above pic is of the Kerala backwaters. The roof of the boat forms a frame which adds depth to the natural beauty of the place.

Create layers

The above pic is of the beautifully lit Ferris Wheel at Luna Park, Sydney. The iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge serves as a frame which adds layers within the shot.

drawing their attention to a defined point

The Dubai Frame leads your eyes into the photograph. It draws your attention to a particular point in the scene.

create more structure

In the above photograph of a church, the archway forms a frame. It creates more structure in the image and makes it visually appealing.

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Click on the below Image to see the Comic wherein the Camera explains Jo, the concept of Frame within a Frame with the help of practical examples.

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Keywords: Basics of Photography, Composition, DSLR Photography for Beginners, DSLR Photography Tutorials, learn DSLR Photography, Frame Within a Frame

How to Use Colour Theory in Photography to create Visually Appealing Pictures

Colours instantly attract your attention, right? While photographing a scene, look for colour combinations that you think will make your picture stand out. You can use the colour theory aka colour schemes, one of the important composition techniques, to create striking images.

We have explained how to use Rule of Thirds, Centred Composition, Leading Lines, Fill the Frame, Pattern and Texture Composition, Rule of Odds in our earlier blogs, now let’s proceed to Colour Theory!

The Colour Wheel

colour wheel

In the above colour wheel, the colours that you see opposite to each other are called Complementary Colours. For instance, pink & green, yellow & blue are complementary colours. On the other hand, colours that you see next to each other on the wheel are known as Analogous Colours. Blue & green, red & orange are Analogous Colours. Third in the Colour Theory is Monochrome wherein you capture a scene in black & white or in varying tones of a single colour.

Now let’s see an example of each of the Colour Theory.

Complementary Colours

Complementary Colours

The above picture of an illuminated building looks appealing. It is because of the presence of complementary colours; yellow, blue and purple.

Colour theory

Here’s another example of complementary colours. The use of pink & green in the frame instantly grabs your attention, isn’t it?

Analogous Colours

Analogous colors

Above is a picture of a (blue) bird amidst greenery. It makes use of analogous colours which is blue & green.

Monochrome

Monochrome colours

Use of black & white colour in the above photograph evokes a different emotion. A coloured photograph wouldn’t have created that effect.

We bring you ‘Jo & His Camera’ Comic Strips wherein a Magical Camera gives DSLR photography tutorials to Jo.

Click on the below Image to see the Comic wherein the Camera explains Jo, the concept of Colour Theory with the help of practical examples.

Colour cover

So, next time – when you are looking to create captivating photographs, think of the Colour Theory!

Keywords: Basics of Photography, Composition, DSLR Photography for Beginners, DSLR Photography Tutorials, learn DSLR Photography, Colour Theory